My 100 Day Challenge Revisited

Back in 2012, I set out to prove the odor-resistant and wrinkle-resistant properties of wool with the 100 Day Challenge, which entailed me wearing a wool shirt for 100 days in a row with no cleaning. Prior to starting the 100 Day Challenge, I started wearing some vintage wool shirts —even though they weren’t entirely work appropriate—to the office and was amazed with the performance relative to the Brooks Brothers non-iron cotton shirts I had been wearing previously. With the wool shirts in the lineup, I stopped doing two things I hated: dry cleaning and ironing. So why don’t more people wear wool button-downs? Two thing I noticed: not a lot of options and a lack of awareness. That’s where the 100 day challenge came in. The story went viral with coverage from Jay Leno, David Letterman, the Today Show, CNN, Fast Company, and others as I launched Wool&Prince.

 This is what happens when your kickstarter goes viral and then you cut it off

This is what happens when your kickstarter goes viral and then you cut it off

 The article that set our kickstarter on a viral trajectory

The article that set our kickstarter on a viral trajectory

 100 days with the same shirt and pictures to prove it

100 days with the same shirt and pictures to prove it

 Possibly my favorite image from the media frenzy thanks to fuji-tv out of Japan

Possibly my favorite image from the media frenzy thanks to fuji-tv out of Japan

Consumers started doing their own versions of the 100 day challenge. A fellow named Andrew Lombardi (pictured below) raised money from his coworkers to buy one of our wool button-downs and in exchange he wore the shirt for a month straight while sending out weekly progress reports to his colleagues (a sample provided below). We've heard similar stories with guys tallying up the number of wears prior to washing and having office competitions to see how many days they can wear the shirts.

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Regardless of whether these guys were consciously simplifying their wardrobe or not, we started to see a lot of value in their minimalist experiments. Aside from having fun, the common themes of a successful experiment were friendly peer pressure, accountability, and support from office colleagues, family, or friends.

With a consecutive day challenge, you'll find yourself:

  • spending less time and money doing laundry and dry cleaning
  • thinking critically about what you need and don't need in your wardrobe
  • learning how to get more wears out of a garment (ie you'll spill less because the stakes are higher, but when you do spill, you'll immediately take action to prevent damage)
  • having a unique conversation starter (Why do we have so many shirts in our closet? Good question!)

If you want to talk with other guys who are taking similar challenges, or you just need some support and built in accountability on your minimalist journey, apply to the Only What Matters community.